31 May

Box bunting favours

 

 

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photographs Emma Sekhon

…a different twist to bunting – make cardboard boxes and fill them with sweets at summer parties and celebrations …

You will need:

Assorted A4 patterned 240gsm card

(check that your printer will take this weight if you are printing the template directly onto the card)

Scalpel or scissors

Double sided tape

Bone folder (optional)

Hole-punch

Tape, string or ribbon for hanging

1

Photocopy the template onto the reverse/plain side of your patterned card.

Using a scalpel and working on a cutting mat cut along the blue lines of the template.

box bunting 5 jemima schlee

2

With a ruler and a bone folder or the handle of your scalpel, on the reverse/ plain side of the card, score along the orange lines of the template.

box bunting 6 jemima schlee

3

Apply double-sided tape to the shaded area A on the reverse/plain side of the card and trim flush to the edges. Peel off the backing tape and, using your card off-cuts, stick a contrasting patterned card on this area.

box bunting 7 jemima schlee

4

Trim flush with the edges.

Apply double-sided tape to the shaded areas B and C of the template on the patterned side of the card and trim flush to the edges.

 box bunting 8 jemima schlee

5

Punch a hole with your hole-punch in the centre of flap A.

 box bunting 9 jemima schlee

6

Peel off the two remaining strips of tape backing and assemble your box bunting (B to B, C to C).

Thread your box bunting onto tape or ribbon through the punched holes.

box bunting 10 jemima schlee

TIPS

When scoring your card, run the bone folder (or the handle of your scalpel) along the edge of a ruler several times – be careful not to cut yourself with the blade. Retaining the position of the ruler, slip the bone folder or blade handle under the card and gently push the card up against the edge of the ruler to create a sharp crease.

Resources

Card: www.craftcreations.com

Bone folder: this is a bookbinding tool used for scoring and folding, available from www.payperbox.co.uk

29 May

Lined linen purse

linbed purse jemima schlee

photograph by Emma Sekhon

… snap open a plain linen purse …

& reveal a rich patterned interior – perfect for a neat little sewing or first aid kit to take on your travels…

you will need:

14 inch x 12 inch plain linen for outer
14 inch x 12 inch heavy fabric stiffener
14 inch x 12 inch floral fabric for lining
5 inch glue-in clip purse frame
Threads to match your fabrics
Scissors
Sewing machine
Sewing needle and pins
Iron
Fabric glue

1

Use the template to cut two pattern pieces from your outer fabric, your lining fabric and your fabric stiffener.

Take your two pieces of lining fabric and place them right sides together. Pin or tack to align the raw edges. Stitch a 3/8in seam by machine along the sides and bottom edges between the two marked dots. Leave a turning gap of 2 1/2in along the bottom seam as indicated. Reverse stitch at the start and finish of all stitching for strength.

Press the seams open with a hot iron – this is a bit fiddly, so take care not to scorch your fingertips with steam. With your work still wrong side out, and starting with one of the bottom corners, create the flat base by putting your hand inside the lining and pushing the corners out and away from the seam. Align the side seam exactly with the bottom seam and press flat so that the corner forms a triangle. Press with a hot iron. Mark a stitch line across the corner by measuring 1in from the tip along the pressed seam. Stitch along this line. Trim this seam to 1/8in.

clip purse photo 2

2

Place your two pieces of outer fabric together, sandwich them between the two pieces of fabric stiffener, pin and tack. Stitch all four of these layers together between the two marked dots with a 3/8in seam as before. Reverse stitch at the start and finish to strengthen.

clip purse photo 3

3

Repeat step 2 to create box corners for the flat base.

clip purse photo 4

4

Cut notches in both the outer and the lining pieces just where the stitching starts and ends. Turn the lining piece right side out and place it inside the outer, stiffened shell (which is still inside out). Align all the raw edges and the side seams, and pin.

Starting at the top center of one side, stitch a 3/8in seam 
all the way around – stop at
the side seams with the needle down, raise the foot and manipulate your work under it so that you can continue without breaking the stitching.

clip purse photo 5

5

Clip notches out of your selvedge, near to but not through the stitch line, along the top curves.

clip purse photo 7

6

Carefully ease the purse right side out through the turning gap. Slipstitch the turning gap closed by hand.

clip purse photo 8

7

Now tease and manipulate the layers along these seams so that you have a good crisp edge all around the top opening. Pin or tack before topstitching 1/16in from the edge.

clip purse photo 9

8

Open your frame out wide. Run a line of fabric glue along the inside of one half
of the frame, starting and stopping 1/16in from the hinge at either side. Do the same along one side
of the purse opening, starting and stopping 3/8in from each side seam. Insert the fabric into the frame, taking care that the sides are at similar levels first and then feeding the center in. Use your fingers or a knitting needle to push the fabric is pushed snuggly in, and make sure that the line of topstitching is hidden. Leave to dry fully before gluing the other side.

clip purse photo 10 clip purse photo 11

Resources

Patterned fabrics (V&A Teal Fat Quarter Bundle): www.vandashop.com

Silver purse frame and fabric glue: www.bag-clasps.co.uk